The 2014 Mexico Haiti Amputee Soccer World Cup Tour is on Facebook

 


OUR MISSION

The mission of the International Institute of SPORT (IIOS) is to improve the quality of life for people with disabilities in the less economically developed countries worldwide.

WHO WE ARE

We are a non-profit advocating for the disabled in areas of public access, education, integration, job skills, physical rehabilitation, therapeutic recreation and disaster relief. We are educators, artists, administrators and professionals. We are also networkers and are grateful for our partners.

WHAT WE DO

We engage children and adults in art projects geared to developing an understanding of disability.  We help rehabilitate and train disabled athletes for the Paralympics. We help disabled people become employees and business owners. We provide art supplies, medical supplies and mobility devices. We represent disabled artists in the world art market. We advocate for the disabled in business and government affairs to help secure access to jobs and transportation.


Education



Crutches & Colors Curriculum Field Test
Lorena Elementary School, Lorena, TX - december 14-17, 2009

Day 1 of the Crutches & Colors curriculum developed by Adaptive Art Instructor Theresa Mosely was given by Ella Snodgrass to her class of 19 third-graders at Lorena Elementary School in December, 2009. Ella adapted the curriculum to fit with her week-long "Christmas Around the World" lessons with a focus on Haiti.

Ella Snodgrass helping one of her students to paint a crutch

Ella Snodgrass taught on various aspects of Haiti including its history, geography, housing, children and poverty. Then, using the Crutches & Colors curriculum, she introduced her students to disabilities and color theory with the theme, "Imagine that all someone wanted for Christmas was a new pair of crutches?" and a response, "We want to give the very best, not just new aluminum crutches - but painted doing our very best to show how much we care."

The students were then introduced to the Global Art Initiative's Crutch Project, and they were very excited to have an opportunity to decorate crutches that would be given to disabled people in Haiti.

 

Ella Snodgrass projects GlobalArtInitiative.org on a screen

 

 

Ella projected our website GlobalArtInitiative.org on a large screen to tie everything together.

"The website was a huge factor in presenting the message in a clear and concise manner," said Ella.  "The format was highly efficient."

Using the website she was able to introduce the artists and show their artwork.

 

Theresa Mosely poses a question to the class about the art being held by Ella Snodgrass

On the final day, the class was joined by Theresa Mosely and Dr. Fred Sorrells. They showed photos of our Haitian artists and displayed original pieces of their art.

Theresa provided additional instruction about styles of art, such as still lifes, landscapes, portraits and abstracts.

Here Theresa Mosely poses a question to the class about the art being held by Ella Snodgrass. Hands are up all over the room.

 

 

Theresa Mosely showing Christmas cards created by Haitian artists Herold Alvares and John Paul Joseph

Theresa also showed Christmas cards created by Haitian artists Herold Alvares and John Paul Joseph. Here the card being shown by Theresa shows a thin Santa Claus carrying a sack that is not bulging with gifts, and it helped to illustrate the impact of poverty on a culture and how art reflects the culture it comes from.

 

Students listen intently to Theresa Mosely as she demonstrated how to paint the crutches

 

 

 

Students listened intently to Theresa Mosely as she demonstrated how to paint the crutches.

Students painting crutches

 

 

 

 

 

The class painted a total of 30 crutches, and three students worked on each crutch.

 

Dr. Sorrells congratulates Zion Kelly

At the conclusion of the class, we congratulated the students, and each student received a print of "Undivided" by Haitian artist Herold Alvares.

Here Dr. Sorrells congratulates Zion Kelly, a young man who requested a photo of Haitian artist John Paul Joseph (JoJo). Zion's request demonstrated that the the curriculum had been successful in helping young people become sensitive to people with disabilities.

Click here for more of Zion's story.

 

19 third-graders proudly display the crutches they carefully painted for disabled people in Haiti

Elizabeth Rogers, Dr. Fred Sorrells, Theresa Mosely and Ella Snodgrass with Ella's 19 third-graders proudly displaying the crutches they carefully painted for disabled people in Haiti.